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This account specifically posts news stories related to the research, science and education system in Aotearoa as well as international stories of potential interest here.

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‍“Make no mistake, right now Aotearoa’s science is under threat like never before,” the coalition’s spokeswoman, New Zealand Association of Scientists co-president Dr Lucy Stewart, said.
“We risk losing our best and brightest scientists and researchers to other countries that really value them, and that will set us back for years.”
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‍In New Zealand and elsewhere, increasing numbers of children are entering schools with specific health needs. And school staff, trained primarily in education, are frequently being tasked with meeting these needs alongside the demands of their daily teaching roles.
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‍"We sent a clear message then that an offer that failed to provide pay parity with our Te Whatu Ora colleagues and compensate for cost-of-living pressures was unacceptable. The poor pay and inequity has been forcing people out of the service and making it harder to recruit so we're very happy to have made this breakthrough at long last."
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‍Associate Professor Wiles brought a claim against her employer, the University of Auckland, for breaching its health and safety obligations, breaching good faith, and for causing her disadvantage as a result of its actions. The Employment Court has now decided in the Associate Professor's favour, following a three-week trial in November last year.
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‍Most crucially, the court found that Wiles’s commentary was, in fact, part of her job. This means that her employer had obligations to protect her under New Zealand’s health and safety legislation. Indeed, the court found that the university had failed in those obligations to Wiles and, in the process, had not fulfilled a host of other responsibilities as her employer.
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Additive to breaching its contractual obligations, Judge J C Holden found that the University of Auckland breached its statutory duties of good faith and acting as a “good employer” under the Employment Relations Act 2000. This obligation was also present in Wiles’s collective employment agreement. ‍
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‍“The other thing that judge found was that the university’s conduct made everything worse and that was something that I definitely felt and argued really strongly and I’m really grateful that the judge agreed with me because it has been a very difficult few years,” Wiles said.
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‍“There was not…a well-developed strategy for dealing with the issues that arose; such a strategy might have been expected given harassment was a known risk for academic staff, especially women,” Judge Joanna Holden said.
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‍“We are significantly below the number of registered midwives that we need to provide the care that’s required,” Violet Clapham from the New Zealand College of Midwives told Stuff’s daily podcast Newsable.
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‍“The other thing I feel quite vindicated about is that the Judge accepted that the University’s conduct made everything worse and so that was really important to me because I definitely felt like I was being singled out and that’s what the Judge found.”
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“In particular, the Court has found that the University had indeed failed in its health and safety obligations to Wiles and, in the process, breached its duty of good faith as an employer. Crucially, the Court found that Wiles’ commentary was, in fact, part of her job, which meant that her employer had obligations to protect her under New Zealand’s health and safety legislation. The judgement is also critical of the attitudes and behaviour of some of Wiles’ managers, which compounded what the judge called “the University’s problematic response”.
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